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What Do Roofing Nails Look Like

Types Of Roof Sheathing

How to : Roofing – Where and How to Nail a Shingle

There are many types of roof decking that you can use for roof sheathing. Depending on your structural requirements and budget, different roof boards may be preferable to others. You should also take into consideration the location and intent of your build.

For instance, if you are building an outdoor gazebo, you might want to invest in more weather-resistant roof sheathing that can withstand the elements.

Here are a few key types of roof decks used for roof sheathing:

Problems With Roofing Nails And Installation

A number of problems can occur with wrongly sized nails installed in roofs. The structure of the roof, alongside its attachment to the house, can be affected.

  • Nails not drilled properly can cause materials such as wood and timber to splinter over time. The gaps and cracks created by those splinters can be problematic because they would allow things to pass through. Another problem would be moisture that can form in the gaps and deform the shape of the wood or cause molds to grow in these spaces.
  • Using longer nails than required when driven into roofs may cause cracks and those nails to loosen and come out.
  • If nails are overdriven, then there is likely to be breakage in the shingle. They may also go all the way through and form holes in the shingle, making it unworthy of use.
  • If nails are under driven, they can create air bubbles making the roof vulnerable to wind damage.

Installing roofing nails seems like a small task however, if not done correctly, it can lead to costly expenses in the long run to fix and redo. Gaps, holes, or cracks made because of improper installation can cause expansion or contraction in the roofing material, which can damage the entire deck.

What Size Roofing Nails Should You Use

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. Accordingly, how long roofing nails should I use?

Nail lengthRoofing nails should be long enough to penetrate the roofing material and go 19 mm into OSB, solid wood, plywood or non-veneer wood decking, or through thickness of decking, whichever is less.

Furthermore, which is better roofing nails or staples? Fasteners for asphalt shingles should be roofing nails or staples. The head of a roofing nail or the crown of a staple is what actually holds a shingle in place. If staples are properly installed, they offer nearly the same wind resistance as nails. The problem with staples is the orientation of the staple crown.

Correspondingly, should roofing nails go through the sheathing?

A 1nail will fully penetrate through 3/8roof sheathing, but it won’t fully penetrate 1/2sheathing. The other way to determine if the proper nails were used is to look in the attic if the roof has 1/2sheathing, you should be able to see the nails sticking through in to the attic.

What causes roofing nails to back out?

When the temperature changes, expansion and contraction can cause the nails to pop up and lift the shingles. You should also make sure your roof is adequately ventilated. Because a nail pop brings the shingle up with it, water penetration under the single can occur, or strong winds can blow the shingle off the work.

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Hot Dipped Galvanized Nails Vs Galvanized Vs Electroplated Vs Stainless Steel Roofing Nails

Question: Roofer used electroplated nails despite contract calling for hot dip galvanized roof nails

Perry Frogge said:

I insisted on hot dip galvanized nails on shingles, it is in the contract. I reminded the supervisor daily.

On Friday they shingled, supervisor calls to say the nails he purchased doesn’t fit the guns and he is proceeding with electroplated, I told him not to, please take 30 min to get right nails.

He refused and finished the roof with electroplated.

No payment made yet. I have no confidence electroplated nails will last 20+ years, can I force roofer to strip and reroof house or do try to ask for $ now for future repairs .

If he refuses will it be up to a judge to decide.

I assume roofer will claim electroplated will last that long. thanks

This question and answer were posted originally at ROOF JOB DISPUTE FAQs-3

Reply:

Perry,

Watch out: before suffering an issue with your roofer, be sure you have accurately identified just what type of nail he used to roof your home. As you’ll read in this article there are several types of roofing nails of various coatings and materials.

Use the page bottom Comments Box to post photos of the nail boxes, labeling, data, and of the type of nail gun used if you can as that will permit us to be sure we know exactly which fastener was used.

The typical life of electroplated roofing nails can be as short as 5 years or as long as 10 years before significant corrosion and loss of secure fastening of the shingles is at risk.

The Different Types Of Roofing Nails

Should roofing nails be visible in the attic?

Jul 28, 2021Blog, Roofing

Your homes roofing system is made up of many exciting parts. It includes the roofing shingle, a deck complete with gutters that catch all your rain and snow before it wreaks havoc on everything inside, as well as those tiny nails that make sure you dont have to worry about any leaks thanks to their incredible design.

Roofing nails may appear insignificant, but they are responsible for keeping your roofing shingles, waterproofing layer, and underlayment in place and prevents it from falling or blowing off.

You have many roofing nails to choose from, and each one has a different purpose. Well break down the types of roof nail options available, how theyre used in construction projects, and how they benefit your home.

There are three main roofing nail types available to you, these are:

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Holding Down The Roof In High Winds

Q: My daughter lives in hurricane country in a 15-year-old stucco house. Can she install hurricane clips to prevent her roof from blowing off?

Don, McKeesport, Pa.

A:Tom Silva replies: Those galvanized metal straps and clips that strengthen the connection between walls and rafters really do help to hold a house together in high winds. But it will be next to impossible to reach those spots from the attic. The only way to retrofit hurricane clips in most houses is by cutting out a section of the siding and the wall sheathing at every spot where a rafter rests on a wall or taking off the roof sheathing at the eaves.

Here’s an easier option: Go up into the attic and run a bead of construction adhesive alongside each rafter where it meets the plywood roof deck. That simple measure will roughly triple a roof’s resistance of being torn off by wind.

What Size Nails Do You Use For Roofing

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The more common roof thickness is 3/4-inch decking. When installing asphalt shingles on felt only to any grade decking you should use 1-inch long roofing nails. When installing dimensional shingles to felt only, Roofhelp.com recommends you use 1 1/4-inch nails.

Additionally, can you use a nail gun for roofing? Roofing manufacturers have determined that hand-nailing shingles and using a nail gun are both valid methods of installing shingles, so it is not a reflection on your roofer’s work quality level if they choose one over the other.

One may also ask, should roofing nails go through the sheathing?

A 1nail will fully penetrate through 3/8roof sheathing, but it won’t fully penetrate 1/2sheathing. The other way to determine if the proper nails were used is to look in the attic if the roof has 1/2sheathing, you should be able to see the nails sticking through in to the attic.

How far should roofing nails penetrate?

Nail lengthRoofing nails should be long enough to penetrate the roofing material and go 19 mm into OSB, solid wood, plywood or non-veneer wood decking, or through thickness of decking, whichever is less.

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What Does Roofing Nails Look Like

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Nails should have a minimum, nominal shank diameter of 11- or 12-gauge, and a minimum head diameter of three-eighths of an inch. The length of each nail must be a minimum of 1¼ inches long, and for roof-overs, Atlas recommends a nail length of at least 2 inches.

Beside above, should roofing nails be exposed? What Should You Do About Exposed Nail Heads on Your Roof? When your roofing contractor installs your roof, they should be careful to place the top layer of shingles directly over top of the nails in the bottom layer of shingles. This way, the nail heads are protected and water does not seep in around them.

Subsequently, one may also ask, what type of roofing nails should I use?

Choosing the right material for your roofing nails.Stainless steel nails are good for fastening tiles and slate. Galvanized roofing nails, or steel nails coated in zinc, are perfect for asphalt shingles, and they hold up well against rust. Aluminum nails should be used for surfaces made out of metal and siding.

How long roofing nails should I use?

Nail lengthRoofing nails should be long enough to penetrate the roofing material and go 19 mm into OSB, solid wood, plywood or non-veneer wood decking, or through thickness of decking, whichever is less.

Staples V 8d Common Nails For Sheathing

How To Properly Start Shingle Courses On A Roof

Staples v 8d Common Nails for Sheathing?

If medium crown power driven staples are use instead of 8d common nails for fastners on roof or wall sheathing , is the nailing schedule the same as code requires for nails.

What length of staple should be used .

And, what is the proper orientation of the staple crown .

Are there any structural integrity advantages of one fastener over the other?

Thanks

  • |#1

    Where do you live? It is my understanding that in some states staples are not allowed to be used for roof sheathing. Im not sure about wall sheathing. Your building inspector can tell you, or it will say something in the buiding code.

  • |#2

    I have never seen a code concerning staples even though we have used them for about 25 years on sheathing and decking. We use the 2 inch long by 12 inch crown staple and we put them 90 degrees to the rafter or stud. On the joints we put the staples parallel to the rafters or studs. The holding power is tremendous. We put the staples about 10 inches apart. WE have used the framing gun and shot #8 sinkers. The duo fast guns I use come with an extra tip to put on the nose so that the #8 nail does not shoot through the decking. The staple gun is much faster.

    James Hart

  • No staples in Florida. And, to top that, the new codes will be requiring ring shank 8s for roof sheathing . No more 8d commons and most likely no more alternates like the 8d CCs for high wind areas.

  • kinda on this subject, a short article from JLC nov-04

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    Proper Nail Application For Asphalt Shingles

    Reading Time: 3 minutes

    Required by the International Building Code, proper nailing is essential to the optimum performance of roofing shingles. Accurate nailing requires the use of approved nails, nail-driving methods and placement .

    Atlas has installation guidelines in place to ensure proper, uniform installation of Atlas shingles on every roof, whether that roof is new or recovered. Nails should have a minimum, nominal shank diameter of 11- or 12-gauge, and a minimum head diameter of three-eighths of an inch. The length of each nail must be a minimum of 1¼ inches long, and for roof-overs, Atlas recommends a nail length of at least 2 inches.

    Nails of the proper length should penetrate three-fourths of an inch into the roof deck. However, where the roof deck is less than three-fourths of an inch thick, the nail should be long enough to penetrate fully and extend at least one-eighth of an inch through the roof deck.

    Each shingle model has specific requirements for nails printed on each shingle wrapper. These guidelines must be followed to comply with building codes and ensure intended performance levels

    All nails need to be driven either by hand or with a properly adjusted pneumatic nailer. Improper adjustment of a pneumatic nailer can result in overdriven or underdriven nails, which can cause nail corrosion, sealing failures, raised tabs, buckling and blow offs.

    For more information about proper nail placement, visit atlasroofing.com/roof-shingles.

    General Guidelines For Nailing Shingles

    To ensure optimal performance of your asphalt roofingshingles, be sure to follow these general directions for proper nailing:

    • Use the correct roofing nail material, size, and grade as specified in the shingle installation instructions.
    • Fasten shingles with corrosion-resistant nails.
    • Install the recommended number of nails per shingle. For Duration® Series shingles, Owens Corning recommends using either a 4- or 6-nail fastening pattern depending on the roofs slope and building code requirements. In most cases, 4 nails are adequate.
    • Position the nails appropriately according to the shingle installation instructions.
    • Align shingles properly to avoid nail exposure.

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    What Are Roofing Nails & How To Pick The Right One For The Job

    When we think about roofing materials, asphalt shingles or clay tiles may come to mind. Choosing a high-quality material that best suits your roof is essential when reroofing or doing any repair work. With that said, you must also use the proper roofing nails when repairing your shingles. The nails help keep everything together. It wont matter how great your roof looks if the nails arent doing their job. This article talks about what roofing nails are and how to choose the right one.

    How Nails Are Sized

    Improper Shingle Nailing = Defective Roof Installation

    The Spruce / Margot Cavin

    You’ve probably heard of nail sizes referred to as 10d, 16d, and so on. The number and “d” suffix are called the “Penny” system. The English penny used to be designated with a “d” representing the first letter of the Roman coin denarius. Originally, the penny number referred to the cost for 100 nails of a particular size. An 8d nail, for example, cost 8 pennies for 100.

    Today, the penny system refers specifically to nail length. A 2d nail is 1 inch long, for example, while a 16d nail is 3 1/2 inches long. Each higher number in the penny system represents a 1/4-inch length increase, up to a 12d nail .

    After the 12d nail, the penny system does not have a clearly defined relationship to length.

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    Can You Reuse Roofing Nails

    If you take off a shingle for repairs or take off the whole roof in preparation for a reroofing job, youll have a ton of roofing nails on hand. You may be tempted to reuse these to save on costs. Thats a bad idea. Not only is it tedious to yank these nails out, but their zinc coating will also be worn. Plus, they may have been otherwise damaged. Its not wise to attempt to reuse them, as they may cause problems on the new roof.

    Should Roofing Nails Protrude Through The Soffit

    Dear Connie: Your contractor is correct in his interpretation of the National Roofing Contractors Association standards as well as the Ohio Building Code, which state that nails must be long enough to penetrate through all roofing materials and extend through the underside of the deck or penetrate a wood plank by ¾ of

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    Different Types Of Construction Nails

    An extensive guide to nails for different construction purposes. We also included helpful tips on working with nails and choosing the right type.

    Nails are one of the most enduring and most common construction materials. Building a wooden house alone can entail 20,000 to 30,000 of nails used. Originally, nails were made of bronze. Then came copper and eventually iron.

    The earliest crafted nails were made by ancient Egyptians and date back 3400 B.C. It was also common for families to make nails for themselves although blacksmiths made them for commercial purposes.

    What Is A Roofing Nail

    Nail pops why they happen and how to fix them

    A roofing nail is, as the name implies, a nail used for installing roofing. There are, however, many types of nails referred to as roofing nails, and these nails have many other uses. The main feature that distinguishes a roofing nail is its large head, which is usually much larger and flatter than other types of nails. This permits the nail to hold down roofing felt and roofing shingles without tearing through the material. Roofing nails generally come in lengths of 1 to 1.75 inches , although shorter and longer nails can be found.

    One element that makes roofing nails unique is the material they are made of. These nails are almost always made of galvanized iron or aluminum. Galvanization adds a thin layer of steel or zinc to an iron nail that prevents it from rusting aluminum is used for the same reason. Roofing nails must stand up to years of rain, snow, and other weather. Rusting is undesirable not only because it will shorten the life of the nail, but because it can cause unsightly stains on a roof.

    The large, flat head on a roofing nail, in addition to helping to hold down roofing materials, also helps prevent water from seeping in. Some roofing nails have a small rubber or plastic washer under the head. This adds another layer of waterproofing to the nail.

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